The Year of the Bookworm

Throughout my entire childhood, I was an avid reader.  The Babysitter’s Club, Goosebumps, Animorphs, R.L.Stine– I had them all.  The sad thing is, by the time I got to an age where more material was available to me, I lost the desire to pick it up.

With so much mandatory reading in high school and university, I gave up on leisure reading. Sadly, I allowed it to escape from my routine.

Since my time in Korea, the habit has slowly returned with a warm welcome.  This year, more than others, I have read some truly inspiring and life changing pieces.  Not surprisingly, I seemed to have veered down the nonfiction, travel writing route.  These well written, funny, and informative stories have given me a glimpse of parts of the world with which I never before had a relationship.

It didn’t push me to jump on the next flight to these places, but instead opened my eyes and my mind to let me know that there are others who have discovered a passion for our world’s mysteries, and my upcoming RTW journey is my way to create my own relationship (and who knows, perhaps write a book about it!).

So in no particular order, here are some of the books that have stayed with me this year:

1. The Lost Girls (by: Jennifer Baggest, Holly Corbett, Amanda Pressner).

This story followed the amazing journey of four friends across four continents as they were each at a crossroads in their lives.  They discovered things about themselves and their friendship.  The reader gets insight from each of the girls at different parts of the trip and you really build a connection with them.  It was a true inspiration to “go for it!”

2. The One Week Job Project (by: Sean Aiken)

Sean Aiken, university graduate, demonstrated a completely new idea in the realm of career searching: try out one job every week for a year. (Yes, 52 straight weeks with just as many jobs!).  He takes the reader across North America and shares his discovery: Find a passion, and if you don’t know what that is, just do something! (Documentary coming out this year!)

3. Honeymoon in Purdah (by: Alison Wearing)

This memoir of an Iranian journey of two Canadian friends disguised as a married couple was an incredible story.  The writing was easy to follow and made you want to know more!  It opened up a secretive world that most of us only have questions and misconceptions about!

4. Three Cups of Tea (by: Greg Mortensen and David Oliver Relin)

This piece followed Mortensen as he encountered a small Pakistani village after his failed attempt to ascend K2.  He immediately knew he wanted to help these people, and promised to return.  Before he knew it, he was asking organizations for help and getting schools built, especially for girls in the remote highland villages.  It was an inspirational story of the power of promise and action!

5. Leaving Microsoft to Change the World (by: John Woods)

This was another incredible story of the willpower to help others in faraway places.  John Wood created Room to Read after a vacation to Nepal and a life-changing experience.  He was determined to bring books to these remote areas, and with that desire, he was able to combine his business knowledge from Microsoft to a nonprofit organization.

6. Eat, Pray, Love (by: Elizabeth Gilbert)

This was another personal journey story, following Elizabeth Gilbert to Italy, India, and Bali, as she was searching for some time on her own, a new relationship with herself and the world around her.

Overall, I’m glad the bookworm has found a place again in my life.  I’m excited to read more on my travels and get recommendations from fellow world explorers.

photo credit: Joe Shlabotnik

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The Year of the Bookworm

Throughout my entire childhood, I was an avid reader.  The Babysitter’s Club, Goosebumps, Animorphs, R.L.Stine– I had them all.  The sad thing is, by the time I got to an age where more material was available to me, I lost the desire to pick it up.

With so much mandatory reading in high school and university, I gave up on leisure reading. Sadly, I allowed it to escape from my routine.

Since my time in Korea, the habit has slowly returned with a warm welcome.  This year, more than others, I have read some truly inspiring and life changing pieces.  Not surprisingly, I seemed to have veered down the nonfiction, travel writing route.  These well written, funny, and informative stories have given me a glimpse of parts of the world with which I never before had a relationship.

It didn’t push me to jump on the next flight to these places, but instead opened my eyes and my mind to let me know that there are others who have discovered a passion for our world’s mysteries, and my upcoming RTW journey is my way to create my own relationship (and who knows, perhaps write a book about it!).

So in no particular order, here are some of the books that have stayed with me this year:

1. The Lost Girls (by: Jennifer Baggest, Holly Corbett, Amanda Pressner).

This story followed the amazing journey of four friends across four continents as they were each at a crossroads in their lives.  They discovered things about themselves and their friendship.  The reader gets insight from each of the girls at different parts of the trip and you really build a connection with them.  It was a true inspiration to “go for it!”

2. The One Week Job Project (by: Sean Aiken)

Sean Aiken, university graduate, demonstrated a completely new idea in the realm of career searching: try out one job every week for a year. (Yes, 52 straight weeks with just as many jobs!).  He takes the reader across North America and shares his discovery: Find a passion, and if you don’t know what that is, just do something! (Documentary coming out this year!)

3. Honeymoon in Purdah (by: Alison Wearing)

This memoir of an Iranian journey of two Canadian friends disguised as a married couple was an incredible story.  The writing was easy to follow and made you want to know more!  It opened up a secretive world that most of us only have questions and misconceptions about!

4. Three Cups of Tea (by: Greg Mortensen and David Oliver Relin)

This piece followed Mortensen as he encountered a small Pakistani village after his failed attempt to ascend K2.  He immediately knew he wanted to help these people, and promised to return.  Before he knew it, he was asking organizations for help and getting schools built, especially for girls in the remote highland villages.  It was an inspirational story of the power of promise and action!

5. Leaving Microsoft to Change the World (by: John Woods)

This was another incredible story of the willpower to help others in faraway places.  John Wood created Room to Read after a vacation to Nepal and a life-changing experience.  He was determined to bring books to these remote areas, and with that desire, he was able to combine his business knowledge from Microsoft to a nonprofit organization.

6. Eat, Pray, Love (by: Elizabeth Gilbert)

This was another personal journey story, following Elizabeth Gilbert to Italy, India, and Bali, as she was searching for some time on her own, a new relationship with herself and the world around her.

Overall, I’m glad the bookworm has found a place again in my life.  I’m excited to read more on my travels and get recommendations from fellow world explorers.

photo credit: Joe Shlabotnik

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Awards

Kristin’s Backpack won 1st Prize for TESL Ontario’s 2011 ESL Week Blog Contest.
About Me


Welcome to Kristin’s Backpack! I jumped on the blogging bandwagon in 2010 to share my Canadian-theatrical-backpacking perspective on my world adventures. With my return to Canada, I will continue to dig into my pockets and reflect on life as it has come to involve Teaching, Travel, and Theatre. Time to unzip the pockets!
Portfolios
Check out my past and current work here: 

Kristin's Library
Looking for some interesting reading material? Check out my Reading Picks and Bookworm post for some ideas! 

               
This is what summer is all about- finished a book yesterday and am on to the next today.  I just opened The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill, which has been on my shelf for ages.  I have been extremely interested in reading accounts that stem from true stories in a dark history that is often swept to the side.  
At the same time, I have been listening to The Maze Runner series as an audio book and have been extremely captivated by the young characters’ circumstances and their view on the world.  
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