The Mysterious World of English Teaching

Back in 2007, I came to South Korea to teach English for a year to make some money to get to Teacher’s College.  That one year turned into four-with more students, cities, adventures, and friends.

Upper intermediateAfter a year at a not-so-impressive hawgwan (private language institute) in the small city of Cheonan, I accepted a position in an English Immersion Program at an elementary school in Daegu.  This unique program was attractive because it allowed me to see the same students every day.  I was able to build a relationship with students, teach them different subjects, and observe their development of the English language.

I enjoyed using an established curriculum mixed with original ideas and activities.  My love for theatre was able to shine through as standing at the front of a classroom was a daily performance with a similar goal as on stage: to engage the audience!

Despite stressful times, the rewards always trumped the hardships.  I tried to make my classroom a place of happiness, laughter, and learning.  I encouraged students to share personal stories daily.  I found it really allowed them to use the language in a fun and useful way; it allowed them to build confidence and interest in using English.

I compiled a list of the 5 necessities for English teachers:

1. Energy– If you don’t bring a positive energetic attitude to class, your students won’t either.

2. Patience– Learning a new language is hard, and you need to be patient with all students as they each have different abilities and learn at different paces.

3. Creativity– You need to be able to take bookwork and change it into enjoyable learning activities to engage all learning styles and allow students to forget they are simply  “in a classroom”.

4. Organization- A good organized lesson anticipates difficulties and incorporates different techniques and activities that will help students alleviate teacher’s frustrations.

5. Control– You need to lead your class in a way that allows students to feel comfortable, and ensure that a lesson moves in the right direction without some learners causing distractions and disturbances for others.

I hope to continue to build on the  skills I have acquired  to use  in my next classroom- wherever that will be!

Creative Commons License photo credit: Shane Global Language Centres

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The Mysterious World of English Teaching

Back in 2007, I came to South Korea to teach English for a year to make some money to get to Teacher’s College.  That one year turned into four-with more students, cities, adventures, and friends.

Upper intermediateAfter a year at a not-so-impressive hawgwan (private language institute) in the small city of Cheonan, I accepted a position in an English Immersion Program at an elementary school in Daegu.  This unique program was attractive because it allowed me to see the same students every day.  I was able to build a relationship with students, teach them different subjects, and observe their development of the English language.

I enjoyed using an established curriculum mixed with original ideas and activities.  My love for theatre was able to shine through as standing at the front of a classroom was a daily performance with a similar goal as on stage: to engage the audience!

Despite stressful times, the rewards always trumped the hardships.  I tried to make my classroom a place of happiness, laughter, and learning.  I encouraged students to share personal stories daily.  I found it really allowed them to use the language in a fun and useful way; it allowed them to build confidence and interest in using English.

I compiled a list of the 5 necessities for English teachers:

1. Energy– If you don’t bring a positive energetic attitude to class, your students won’t either.

2. Patience– Learning a new language is hard, and you need to be patient with all students as they each have different abilities and learn at different paces.

3. Creativity– You need to be able to take bookwork and change it into enjoyable learning activities to engage all learning styles and allow students to forget they are simply  “in a classroom”.

4. Organization- A good organized lesson anticipates difficulties and incorporates different techniques and activities that will help students alleviate teacher’s frustrations.

5. Control– You need to lead your class in a way that allows students to feel comfortable, and ensure that a lesson moves in the right direction without some learners causing distractions and disturbances for others.

I hope to continue to build on the  skills I have acquired  to use  in my next classroom- wherever that will be!

Creative Commons License photo credit: Shane Global Language Centres

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Awards

Kristin’s Backpack won 1st Prize for TESL Ontario’s 2011 ESL Week Blog Contest.
About Me


Welcome to Kristin’s Backpack! I jumped on the blogging bandwagon in 2010 to share my Canadian-theatrical-backpacking perspective on my world adventures. With my return to Canada, I will continue to dig into my pockets and reflect on life as it has come to involve Teaching, Travel, and Theatre. Time to unzip the pockets!
Portfolios
Check out my past and current work here: 

Kristin's Library
Looking for some interesting reading material? Check out my Reading Picks and Bookworm post for some ideas! 

               
This is what summer is all about- finished a book yesterday and am on to the next today.  I just opened The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill, which has been on my shelf for ages.  I have been extremely interested in reading accounts that stem from true stories in a dark history that is often swept to the side.  
At the same time, I have been listening to The Maze Runner series as an audio book and have been extremely captivated by the young characters’ circumstances and their view on the world.  
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