Korean School to the CELTA Classroom

Today marks my one-month-to-go status.  One month from now I will be in Rio de Janeiro, gearing up for Carnaval 2011.  I am trying to not get too excited or nervous yet, as I still have lots to do before I get on that plane.  It will be the first time I am going on an “unlimited” vacation with no job to run back to.

First and foremost, I still have three more weeks to work: two weeks of teaching my students with whom I have spent the past year trying to engage with the wonderful English language; and one week of training the new teachers that will arrive at my school.  Secondly, I need to pack.  And by pack I mean go through everything I’ve accumulated during my three years in Daegu and choose which items will be shipped to Canada, packed into my South America backpack, or tossed in the trash.  It’s a little overwhelming and time consuming, since “going through stuff” always brings up memories and causes daydreaming.

Since I’m on vacation this week, my “daydreams” have been more prevalent.  There has been a tug-of-war between teaching memories and future teaching premonitions.  During my three years at my Korean elementary school I have come to know so many young, eager, energetic students.  Some days the students inspire me to bring energy and creativity to the classroom; other days, when students are tired or frustrated, it is my responsibility to inspire them to reciprocate the energy and creativity.

My premonitions have been mostly concerned with questions: Where will my next job be? Will I succeed in this new classroom?  Will I remember how to teach?

Like with any job, there are good days and bad days.  And as in any field, we need to know if we belong there or if there are just too many bad days to handle.  As teachers, we owe it to our students to put forth the same effort we demand of them, or else get out of the classroom.

Korea has taught me a lot about the kind of teacher I want to be.  I thought I would have returned to Canada by now and applied myself in the regular school system.  However, I began to create a  relationship with teaching English as a Foreign Language.  I started to really appreciate the challenge of teaching non-native speakers to use and enjoy English.  I soon understood that I wanted to continue in this field and learn more on how to excel in the classroom.

That’s when I found the CELTA course.  I knew that getting teaching jobs in other countries was easier with this qualification, but I didn’t anticipate how much I was actually going to love learning about teaching.   It was four weeks of hard work and concentration, and my brain took a few days to adjust to being on the opposite side of the classroom.  Luckily, after settling in, I was happy to participate in the cleverly designed “lectures” that geared us trainees to observe, participate in, and comment on various teaching techniques.  It opened my mind to recall my own classroom and take note of why some methods worked better than others.

The trainers were amazingly helpful and insightful.  They gave just enough guidance but knew when to let go of our hands.  Similarly, despite being intimidating at first, observing and critiquing others as well as receiving feedback became much appreciated throughout the course.

I highly recommend a training course such as this one because it re-energized me to return to my classroom with more knowledge that could only benefit myself and my students.  I studied through International House, which provides CELTA courses worldwide.  I found the set up in its Chiang Mai, Thailand location (room and board provided at the center) allowed me to fully immerse myself into the course.  It was recommended to me through a friend, and I highly recommend it to other aspiring teachers.

The English Teaching  field is growing as the world is getting smaller, and I am excited to be a part of it, as I continue to travel, learn languages, and am eager to see where my next classroom will be.

Photo credit Editor B

One Response to Korean School to the CELTA Classroom
  1. Geri
    March 28, 2017 | 11:39 am

    Mais recursos que são abundante nocivos e cada vez além disso usados por jovens que jamais possui
    conselho médica é consumo dentre substâncias abrasivas visto que ácidos. http://Www.iraqiyeen.com/index.php?a=profile&u=crystalnich

Leave a Reply

Korean School to the CELTA Classroom

Today marks my one-month-to-go status.  One month from now I will be in Rio de Janeiro, gearing up for Carnaval 2011.  I am trying to not get too excited or nervous yet, as I still have lots to do before I get on that plane.  It will be the first time I am going on an “unlimited” vacation with no job to run back to.

First and foremost, I still have three more weeks to work: two weeks of teaching my students with whom I have spent the past year trying to engage with the wonderful English language; and one week of training the new teachers that will arrive at my school.  Secondly, I need to pack.  And by pack I mean go through everything I’ve accumulated during my three years in Daegu and choose which items will be shipped to Canada, packed into my South America backpack, or tossed in the trash.  It’s a little overwhelming and time consuming, since “going through stuff” always brings up memories and causes daydreaming.

Since I’m on vacation this week, my “daydreams” have been more prevalent.  There has been a tug-of-war between teaching memories and future teaching premonitions.  During my three years at my Korean elementary school I have come to know so many young, eager, energetic students.  Some days the students inspire me to bring energy and creativity to the classroom; other days, when students are tired or frustrated, it is my responsibility to inspire them to reciprocate the energy and creativity.

My premonitions have been mostly concerned with questions: Where will my next job be? Will I succeed in this new classroom?  Will I remember how to teach?

Like with any job, there are good days and bad days.  And as in any field, we need to know if we belong there or if there are just too many bad days to handle.  As teachers, we owe it to our students to put forth the same effort we demand of them, or else get out of the classroom.

Korea has taught me a lot about the kind of teacher I want to be.  I thought I would have returned to Canada by now and applied myself in the regular school system.  However, I began to create a  relationship with teaching English as a Foreign Language.  I started to really appreciate the challenge of teaching non-native speakers to use and enjoy English.  I soon understood that I wanted to continue in this field and learn more on how to excel in the classroom.

That’s when I found the CELTA course.  I knew that getting teaching jobs in other countries was easier with this qualification, but I didn’t anticipate how much I was actually going to love learning about teaching.   It was four weeks of hard work and concentration, and my brain took a few days to adjust to being on the opposite side of the classroom.  Luckily, after settling in, I was happy to participate in the cleverly designed “lectures” that geared us trainees to observe, participate in, and comment on various teaching techniques.  It opened my mind to recall my own classroom and take note of why some methods worked better than others.

The trainers were amazingly helpful and insightful.  They gave just enough guidance but knew when to let go of our hands.  Similarly, despite being intimidating at first, observing and critiquing others as well as receiving feedback became much appreciated throughout the course.

I highly recommend a training course such as this one because it re-energized me to return to my classroom with more knowledge that could only benefit myself and my students.  I studied through International House, which provides CELTA courses worldwide.  I found the set up in its Chiang Mai, Thailand location (room and board provided at the center) allowed me to fully immerse myself into the course.  It was recommended to me through a friend, and I highly recommend it to other aspiring teachers.

The English Teaching  field is growing as the world is getting smaller, and I am excited to be a part of it, as I continue to travel, learn languages, and am eager to see where my next classroom will be.

Photo credit Editor B

One Response to Korean School to the CELTA Classroom
  1. Geri
    March 28, 2017 | 11:39 am

    Mais recursos que são abundante nocivos e cada vez além disso usados por jovens que jamais possui
    conselho médica é consumo dentre substâncias abrasivas visto que ácidos. http://Www.iraqiyeen.com/index.php?a=profile&u=crystalnich

Leave a Reply

Awards

Kristin’s Backpack won 1st Prize for TESL Ontario’s 2011 ESL Week Blog Contest.
About Me


Welcome to Kristin’s Backpack! I jumped on the blogging bandwagon in 2010 to share my Canadian-theatrical-backpacking perspective on my world adventures. With my return to Canada, I will continue to dig into my pockets and reflect on life as it has come to involve Teaching, Travel, and Theatre. Time to unzip the pockets!
Portfolios
Check out my past and current work here: 

Kristin's Library
Looking for some interesting reading material? Check out my Reading Picks and Bookworm post for some ideas! 

               
This is what summer is all about- finished a book yesterday and am on to the next today.  I just opened The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill, which has been on my shelf for ages.  I have been extremely interested in reading accounts that stem from true stories in a dark history that is often swept to the side.  
At the same time, I have been listening to The Maze Runner series as an audio book and have been extremely captivated by the young characters’ circumstances and their view on the world.  
Find me on Facebook