Interview Questions for ESL Teachers to Ask

As  I continue to meet more and more people on my travels, the topic of my job as an ESL teacher repeatedly pops up.  I have had the opportunity to explain to others what a wonderful and rewarding experience it is working in the ESL field.  I have been lucky with the schools I have taught at because I was a part of fantastic English programs that employed a wonderful staff.

When looking for a job in an ESL program, there can be an overwhelming number of options in an vast number of countries.

Therefore, when you get the chance to speak to a specific school, there are important questions that you, as a potential employee, should not hesitate to ask.

1.  How long has the English program been running?

2.  Does the program follow a set curriculum?  What kinds of books are used?

3.  How are the classes chosen? (ability, age, grade).  How many students per class?

4.  Where is the school located? (urban or rural? Near public transportation?)

5.  How many teachers are there (Native English and others)?

6.  What are the teachers’ responsibilities? (lesson planning, choosing curriculum, writing tests and evaluations, extra-curricular activities)

7.  Is there teacher training set up for new staff members?

Others words of advice:

1.   Information should be very clear about living arrangements, vacation, salary, flight tickets. Some schools have been known to blame misunderstood contract agreements on a language barrier.  If you are not getting the answers you need, you have a right to ask for an interpreter to help you communicate with school directors.  This will eliminate any unfortunate surprises upon your arrival.  This is especially helpful for moving to a foreign country!

2.  You should always ask for contact information for a current Native English speaking employee for any further information about the school or area.  This is very useful for becoming settled in a new place.  You can have information about expat community events, clubs, language learning information or good places to shop for necessities.

If a school does not want you to contact a current employee, you can take that as a hint that the school might have some problems they do not want you to know about it.

A school either gets a reputation because it is a great place to work or because no one wants to work there.  With these questions, you can make sure the school you choose has the right kind of reputation and that you will have an enjoyable teaching position with their program.

Photo credit- Suzanne13

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Interview Questions for ESL Teachers to Ask

As  I continue to meet more and more people on my travels, the topic of my job as an ESL teacher repeatedly pops up.  I have had the opportunity to explain to others what a wonderful and rewarding experience it is working in the ESL field.  I have been lucky with the schools I have taught at because I was a part of fantastic English programs that employed a wonderful staff.

When looking for a job in an ESL program, there can be an overwhelming number of options in an vast number of countries.

Therefore, when you get the chance to speak to a specific school, there are important questions that you, as a potential employee, should not hesitate to ask.

1.  How long has the English program been running?

2.  Does the program follow a set curriculum?  What kinds of books are used?

3.  How are the classes chosen? (ability, age, grade).  How many students per class?

4.  Where is the school located? (urban or rural? Near public transportation?)

5.  How many teachers are there (Native English and others)?

6.  What are the teachers’ responsibilities? (lesson planning, choosing curriculum, writing tests and evaluations, extra-curricular activities)

7.  Is there teacher training set up for new staff members?

Others words of advice:

1.   Information should be very clear about living arrangements, vacation, salary, flight tickets. Some schools have been known to blame misunderstood contract agreements on a language barrier.  If you are not getting the answers you need, you have a right to ask for an interpreter to help you communicate with school directors.  This will eliminate any unfortunate surprises upon your arrival.  This is especially helpful for moving to a foreign country!

2.  You should always ask for contact information for a current Native English speaking employee for any further information about the school or area.  This is very useful for becoming settled in a new place.  You can have information about expat community events, clubs, language learning information or good places to shop for necessities.

If a school does not want you to contact a current employee, you can take that as a hint that the school might have some problems they do not want you to know about it.

A school either gets a reputation because it is a great place to work or because no one wants to work there.  With these questions, you can make sure the school you choose has the right kind of reputation and that you will have an enjoyable teaching position with their program.

Photo credit- Suzanne13

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Awards

Kristin’s Backpack won 1st Prize for TESL Ontario’s 2011 ESL Week Blog Contest.
About Me


Welcome to Kristin’s Backpack! I jumped on the blogging bandwagon in 2010 to share my Canadian-theatrical-backpacking perspective on my world adventures. With my return to Canada, I will continue to dig into my pockets and reflect on life as it has come to involve Teaching, Travel, and Theatre. Time to unzip the pockets!
Portfolios
Check out my past and current work here: 

Kristin's Library
Looking for some interesting reading material? Check out my Reading Picks and Bookworm post for some ideas! 

               
This is what summer is all about- finished a book yesterday and am on to the next today.  I just opened The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill, which has been on my shelf for ages.  I have been extremely interested in reading accounts that stem from true stories in a dark history that is often swept to the side.  
At the same time, I have been listening to The Maze Runner series as an audio book and have been extremely captivated by the young characters’ circumstances and their view on the world.  
Find me on Facebook